Marine assistance – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 11:05:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://seatowct.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Marine assistance – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ 32 32 Meet the Defenders of Ukraine: (1) At the 25th Airborne Brigade Casualty Treatment Center – KyivPost https://seatowct.com/meet-the-defenders-of-ukraine-1-at-the-25th-airborne-brigade-casualty-treatment-center-kyivpost/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:21:28 +0000 https://seatowct.com/meet-the-defenders-of-ukraine-1-at-the-25th-airborne-brigade-casualty-treatment-center-kyivpost/ It was by no means expected that our visit to the unit’s Casualty Treatment Center (CPC) would see wounded Ukrainian soldiers coming out of the fighting line. But the Airborne Brigade told us we could take just about any picture we wanted and interview just about anyone. And I told them that what the Kyiv […]]]>

It was by no means expected that our visit to the unit’s Casualty Treatment Center (CPC) would see wounded Ukrainian soldiers coming out of the fighting line.

But the Airborne Brigade told us we could take just about any picture we wanted and interview just about anyone. And I told them that what the Kyiv Post wanted to do was see the enlisted soldiers do their job, if possible.

So when the ambulances delivered two groups of wounded infantry to the Brigade CPC and the doctors and nurses swung into action, Kyiv Post photographer Christopher Occhicone and I were there as observers. We tried to stay away.

The 25th Brigade CPC is on the ground floor, several rooms in a government building used by medical personnel to treat and treat most, but not all, of its soldiers with sufficient combat damage to be removed from the line. head on to receive serious medical help.

Truly serious cases, requiring complicated surgery or other risky life-saving work, are transported by ambulance directly to a city hospital reinforced by military doctors and nurses.

Olena Saprykina prepares an IV while medical workers treat a group of men with severe concussions as a result of Russian artillery at the 25th Brigade Casualty Reception Center in Airbourne, Donetsk region, Ukraine, 10 May 2022 (Photo credit: Christopher Occhicone / Redux) ( Christopher Occhicone/Redux)

Chris and I learned that the city hospital is fully capable of treating 99% of the worst combat injuries, even though some of the equipment is old.

At the CPC where we were, a team of nurses and doctors are treating soldiers who are injured but – probably – not life-threatening. The day we were there, about ten kilometers to the east, a powerful RF munition (or munitions) hit combat line positions held by infantrymen of the 25th Brigade. A total of eight men were evacuated by ambulance.

The CPC consists of four or five cribs arranged in a well-lit room, with shelves along the walls stocked with medical supplies. Each bed has an IV stand, and on each IV stand is an empty water bottle cut in half to hold a spare IV bag.

A medical worker treats a group of men with severe concussions as a result of Russian artillery at the 25th Airborne Brigade’s casualty reception center, Donetsk region, Ukraine, May 10, 2022 (photo credit: Christopher Occhicone / Redux) (Christopher Occhicone/Redux)

On each of the four was a Ukrainian soldier, each man shirtless. They were mostly young, in their twenties, but one man appeared to be in his thirties and the other was old enough to have a gray beard.

All of them were dirty and disoriented, but other than the bruises, I couldn’t see any visible wounds on them. All of them seemed, to a greater or lesser degree, fearful and confused, not much different from how a person deals with a serious car accident. A nurse told me that all four were concussion cases.

They all seemed to be in pain, and one man, he looked like the most affected, was rolling from side to side and moaning. From time to time he looked around the room. I guess it was instinct to seek help.

He had blue eyes. It’s hard to make eye contact with someone in pain and say “do something for me if you can,” and your job is to watch.

But it’s much, much harder to be crushed by an explosion powerful enough to throw a grown man through the air, rip the clothes off his back, and leave him weak and hoping very, very much that a stranger will help him.

Two or three doctors were in the background, but a nursing team of three women in their 30s and 40s, and one in her 20s, did most of the work. Each man was gently interrogated, and if he still had any clothes above his waist, they were removed.

A nurse examined each man, particularly the stomach and chest, for signs of damaged internal organs or bleeding. Modern equipment to scan a patient like x-ray machine or ultrasound machine was not in the room.

The hardest-hit soldier was given an electrocardiogram by a nurse using a 1950s Soviet-era heart monitor system with rubber bulbs as suction cups to attach the individual listening sensors to the man’s chest.

A nurse told me that, if necessary, a wounded soldier can have scans using modern equipment at the city hospital. The primary function of the CDC, she said, was to care for and stabilize injured soldiers who, most likely, mostly need rest and supervision to recover from whatever injured them in combat.

At present, 25th Brigade CDC mostly fixes bones, recovers shrapnel that hasn’t penetrated too deeply into soldiers’ bodies, and frequently deals with concussion cases. .

After checking for damaged internal organs, the primary treatment for the concussion appeared to be intravenous painkillers. It seemed to work quickly and the soldiers told the nurses, who checked every few minutes, that the pain was decreasing.

Meanwhile, nurses checked the ears for blast damage and repeated these checks to see if the hearing loss returned. In some cases it was fast, in others not.

The way the nurses worked was not like in the movies. No one was running, no one was shouting the Ukrainian version of “Stat!” “, medical supplies were not thrown everywhere, no soldier had suffered so much that he had to be physically restrained, strangers were not ordered to leave the room, there was no of dramatic fumbling on the part of the pretty young nurse to put an IV in the arm of a handsome soldier.

The work was smooth. It was quite obvious that these women had treated wounded soldiers many times before. They worked methodically, step by step, and constantly talked to each other: “this man needs to have his bowels checked”, “this man is good to go to the recovery room”, “make sure to note that this man rings in his ears.

Later I found out that the 25th Brigade had been fighting since the first day of the war and was almost constantly taking casualties. CPC staff can request a day off, but very rarely does anyone take one.

I spoke with an ambulance driver named Oleksandr, a reservist drafted into service in April. He drives a civilian Peugeot ambulance donated by a civilian group sending aid to Ukraine. He apologized for the condition of the vehicle, but the roads in the area, he explained, are extremely bad, ambulances have to drive as fast as possible, and it quickly demolishes anything whose wheels are not on it. fully capable of serious off-roading.

He told me that the pick-up and delivery of the next four injured, also concussed by an explosion, went reasonably well. Fortunately, his run back from the line of combat to the CDC encountered no Russian artillery fire.

Sometimes Oleksandr has to throw a gauntlet of explosions to keep the wounded away from the line of battle. One ambulance I saw had personal body armor hanging over the driver and passenger window to protect the driver from shrapnel.

Civilian ambulances donated by Ukrainian and Western aid groups save lives, Oleksandr told me, but their patient compartments are not equipped with any armour.

But the visit didn’t go without one of those strange coincidences of war.

One of the soldiers, a tall man in his twenties with a curly black beard, was a little better off than the others. He seemed to recover quickly, and while the painkillers were doing their job, he was up and talking to one of the doctors.

He kept looking at me, which reporters get used to as a stranger among people in distress. He finally called me and said he was pretty sure he knew me.

We compared notes, and yes, it turns out that in the late 2000s he had served in the 36th marine brigade when I was an American member of the OSCE international mission monitoring the conflict Donbass in the Mariupol sector.

Our OSCE patrols passed through Marine positions from time to time, I frequently led the patrols and when I did, I was the OSCE guy who ended up talking to the Marines.

Apparently, I had passed through his checkpoint or questioned his commander several times. I didn’t remember him.

His name is Ruslan. Now Ruslan is in the 25th Airborne Brigade and I work for the Kyiv Post.

After the second group of four injured people were treated, the youngest nurse, a 20-year-old woman named Olena, did not rest but instead sat with the head nurse and one doctors, and passed the personal examination details of each of the injured, making sure that all was well.

There had been some minor discrepancies in the casualty information reported by the field to the CPC.

The entire brigade’s executive officer, a lieutenant colonel who during the day had proven to be quite a good-natured man with a well-developed sense of humor and a relaxed approach to command, took the radio and the phone and said harshly subordinates on the other end to get details of the injured.

“The 25th Brigade demands that casualty information be accurate, first time, without exception,” he said.

Ruslan was alone when I left.

The doctor told me he would be fine after resting for a few days, and there was a warm building with food and warmth and plenty of support staff to take care of him, before it never wraps.

The chances of us ever seeing each other again are virtually nil.

We shook hands, wished each other luck, told each other to stay safe, and parted ways.

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Biden made himself wartime president. The polls show him in a niche and most people fear a nuclear war. – https://seatowct.com/biden-made-himself-wartime-president-the-polls-show-him-in-a-niche-and-most-people-fear-a-nuclear-war/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:02:59 +0000 https://seatowct.com/biden-made-himself-wartime-president-the-polls-show-him-in-a-niche-and-most-people-fear-a-nuclear-war/ Joseph Biden may be the worst American president in US history. Will Biden be the one to lead the world to nuclear war? It seems likely. There is no other end game. FPMag editors explain why, here. by Melissa Hemingway and Michael John Ironically, America is in such bad shape that it elected touch, not […]]]>

Joseph Biden may be the worst American president in US history. Will Biden be the one to lead the world to nuclear war? It seems likely. There is no other end game. FPMag editors explain why, here.


by Melissa Hemingway and Michael John


Ironically, America is in such bad shape that it elected touch, not so bright, so-called sneaky, influence peddling Joe Biden. Here is Joe Biden to explain himself (video).

Video: Joe Biden explains how he has used financial coercion (“You don’t get the billion dollars unless you fire the prosecutor”, a bribe?), To make the decisions in Ukrainian governance since era of the Obama administration.


If you want to see and feel the White House Biden’s deepest contribution to Americans, fill up the automotive gas tank anywhere in America.

The Democrats had good people campaigning for the 2020 nomination ahead of the 2020 election. In a last-minute move that resurrected Biden’s nomination bid, a move many Democrats today call a “cheat,” Democratic officials helped Biden suddenly exit the end of the peloton. Now he’s controversial US President Biden (Republicans claim he hasn’t won to date) and everything he touches turns into dog breakfast (poor Fido).

Biden blames someone else for his missteps like inflation and Afghanistan. They were still SSOBs. Here he slams a reporter whom Biden calls an SSOB. Both the current and past US presidents have done much to encourage violence against print and broadcast journalists. It is shown all over the world.


Pushing hard for a war with Russia since 2014, Biden basically took over Ukraine using American taxpayers’ money. It wasn’t difficult. Ukraine is the second most corrupt nation in Europe, with Russia being the first. According to Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 2021, (a scale from least to most corrupt nations), Ukraine ranked 122nd out of 180 countries in 2021, the second most corrupt in Europe, with Russia being the most corrupt at 136.


The British Army says the proxy war is going well for the UK and America.

“Despite initial small-scale advances, Russia has failed to make substantial territorial gains over the past month while maintaining consistently high levels of attrition,” the UK MoD said on Twitter.

  • Russian Major Generals Magomed Tushayev, Andrey Sukhovetsky, Vitaly Gerasimov, Andrei Kolesnikov, Oleg Mityaev, Vladimir Frolov and Andrei Simonov were all killed in Ukraine with American help. Lieutenant Generals Andrey Mordvichev and Yakov Rezantsev were also killed in Ukraine with US tracking and targeting according to a US Pentagon leak.
  • Additionally, dozens of Russian colonels were massacred on March 23, 2022, according to Ukrainian official Mykhailo Podoliak who said Ukrainian forces killed “dozens of colonels and other officers with the help of tracking and targeting Americans”.
  • The New York Times reported that US intelligence provided real-time intelligence to help the Ukrainian military target Russian generals.
  • Former Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Kasyanov said last Friday that Vladimir Putin’s confidence in the war in Ukraine had been shaken. He told an interviewer on Deutsche Welle that the Russian president may have been misled by his generals about the state of the war.
  • Russia is said to have lost more than 650 tanks and about 3,000 other armored vehicles and heavy equipment, according to Western media, so far in the military operation in Ukraine.
  • America plans to send an additional $40 billion in war aid to Ukraine, but after House approval it is waiting for a deadline for the bill to pass the US Senate.
  • Ukraine claims it defeated Russia in the northeast and pushed Russian forces back to the Russian border in a counteroffensive.
  • Putin said Russia would react strongly to Finland and Sweden joining NATOand bringing NATO weapons at the borders of Russia.
  • Some analysts now believe that Putin’s next best move is to annihilate kyiv with a massive nuclear strike rather than surrender to NATO and stand trial for alleged war crimes. “In other words, Putin has nothing to lose by going nuclear,” says Dale Carter, director of security at the RINJ Foundation.
  • No one seems to agree with the US strategy of starting a proxy war with Russia that has no other possible outcome than nuclear conflagration.
  • “Russia deliberately boasts that it can destroy with nuclear weapons not only a certain country but the entire planet,” Volodymyr Zelenskiyy said a month ago.
  • The rumors circulating that Vladimir Putin is not well and may be suffering from a blood disorder, leukemia are unconfirmed but it is quite obvious that something is wrong.

The US plan to use Ukraine as a proxy against Russia has been in effect for a decade or more. America dislikes or even dislikes Ukraine other than as disposable collateral. Every explosive device sent to Ukraine explodes in Ukraine and destroys more buildings and infrastructure, killing more people.

Ukraine is a mess. Estimates suggest more than 100,000 people have died since February 24, split evenly between the two sides as the United States pumps more heavy weapons into the country to detonate them inside Ukraine.

“The construction of the Ukrainian army cost several billion dollars and millions of hours of work from NATO the nation’s military advisers and training crews pressured by the US government to dump weapons and train in Ukraine to attack ethnic Russians in the Donbass whose peoples had exercised their right to self-determination and left Ukraine to form their own countries, Luhansk PR and Donetsk PR. It was only eight years later that Russia recognized its statehood and began the military operation to protect these civilians and support local militias threatened by an invading army of 60,000 Ukrainian soldiers backed by the United States and neo-Nazi militias,” says Carter. who has been in Ukraine since mid-February.


UKRAINE 07.03.2021: US Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division poses for a photo during Exercise Sea Breeze 21 at an undisclosed location July 3, 2021. Exercise Sea Breeze is an annual event that brings together military units from multiple countries, including Ukraine, and within the 2d Marine Expeditionary Force, to enhance their combat capabilities and build strong relationships. (US Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacqueline Parsons)

At the start of 2021, Biden and the Pentagon were looking for a new war as military sales in America fell by a third.

Ukrainian tanks attack civilians in DOnetsk and Luhansk regions

Ukrainian tanks pile up on the Donbass line of contact on January 24, 2022. Analysts now say US domestic politics compelled Biden to try to force Russia to rescue allied nations of Donetsk PR and PR of Luhansk, or facing their invasion by more than 60,000 troops are now gathering. It will be a major invasion worse than any attack in the past eight years. Photo credit: Melissa Hemingway / FPMag in Ukraine.

America needed a war after military sales organized by the US government fell 31%

US military sales fell by more than $37 billion.  Biden is looking for a war.

Direct military sales by U.S. companies fell 17% to $103 billion in fiscal year 2021 from $124 billion in fiscal year 2020, while sales arranged through the U.S. government fell by 31% to $34.8 billion in 2021 from $50.8 billion the previous year, the State Department said.
U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Drushal, second from left, commander of U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, discusses Saudi Foreign Military Sales cases with members of the Executive Committee during the United States-Saudi Arabia Security Assistance Review held in Washington, DC, July 15-19, 2021 — File Photo: Photo by Richard Bumgardner
United States Army Security Assistance Command

Will this be Biden’s legacy?

If populations are massacred by atomic weapons, or starved, what is the moral difference?

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Man’s body found in Cherry Creek Reservoir a week after boating accident – CBS Denver https://seatowct.com/mans-body-found-in-cherry-creek-reservoir-a-week-after-boating-accident-cbs-denver/ Sun, 15 May 2022 01:05:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/mans-body-found-in-cherry-creek-reservoir-a-week-after-boating-accident-cbs-denver/ CHERRY CREEK STATE PARK, Colorado (CBS4) – Search and rescue personnel pulled the body of a 29-year-old man from the Cherry Creek Reservoir on Saturday, a week after the man slipped from an inner tube pulled by a boat and failed resurfaced. Colorado Parks and Wildlife said in a Twitter post that its marine evidence […]]]>

CHERRY CREEK STATE PARK, Colorado (CBS4) – Search and rescue personnel pulled the body of a 29-year-old man from the Cherry Creek Reservoir on Saturday, a week after the man slipped from an inner tube pulled by a boat and failed resurfaced.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife said in a Twitter post that its marine evidence recovery team located and recovered the man’s body with the assistance of South Metro Fire Rescue personnel and equipment.

(Credit: Colorado Parks and Wildlife/Twitter)

The agency said it suspects the man drowned, but the official cause of death will be determined by the Arapahoe County Coroner’s Office.

That same office will also release the man’s identity after his family members are notified of the recovery.

Search teams expand search for missing man in Cherry Creek Reservoir

The reservoir reopened to boating Friday morning. It had been closed since Sunday.

(Credit: Colorado Parks and Wildlife/Twitter)

The authorities were alerted to the disappearance of the man around 7 p.m. last Saturday.

Initial search efforts focused on water depths of 15 feet approximately 300 meters from the marina at the western end of the reservoir. Aerial and underwater drones were used.

A member of the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office launches a drone in an effort to search for a missing man May 7 at Cherry Creek Reservoir. (credit: CBS)

What started as a search was changed to a recovery operation when the man was not found within the first 90 minutes of the search. He apparently wasn’t wearing a life jacket.

“In a situation like this, our number one priority is getting the victim back to their family,” said CPW Marine Evidence Recovery Team Leader Jim Hawkins. “It is the families who hold us together during these recovery operations. This is a very technical job that requires skill and experience. Not all recoveries are the same and these searches are dynamic, but a well-coordinated team effort between all agencies led to the recovery.

Additional help during the week-long effort came from the Summit County and Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Offices, CPW Park Rangers, American Red Cross, search and rescue dogs from United States and two fishing guides from Tightline Outdoors who volunteered to help with the search by running their own sonar units.

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Coast Guard rescues migrants off Puerto Rico after 11 people die in capsizing https://seatowct.com/coast-guard-rescues-migrants-off-puerto-rico-after-11-people-die-in-capsizing/ Fri, 13 May 2022 01:20:55 +0000 https://seatowct.com/coast-guard-rescues-migrants-off-puerto-rico-after-11-people-die-in-capsizing/ US Coast Guard rescue teams scour the waters off Puerto Rico after a boat apparently carrying migrants capsized, killing 11 passengers. The capsized boat was spotted Thursday noon near a desert island. Authorities say they were able to rescue 31 migrants from the water and are looking for other survivors. Despite the perilous journey, migrants […]]]>

US Coast Guard rescue teams scour the waters off Puerto Rico after a boat apparently carrying migrants capsized, killing 11 passengers.

The capsized boat was spotted Thursday noon near a desert island. Authorities say they were able to rescue 31 migrants from the water and are looking for other survivors. Despite the perilous journey, migrants continue to risk their lives in hopes of reaching the United States

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) patrol aircraft spotted the vessel around noon about 10 miles north of Desecheo Island off the west coast of Puerto Rico, the official said. agency spokesman Jeffrey Quiñones. Newsweek in an email.

The capsized ship was described by CBP as a “yola,” a wooden boat used to transport migrants and contraband. The patrol plane crew spotted more than 20 people in the water and requested assistance from CBP, as well as the Puerto Rico Police Marine Unit and the U.S. Coast Guard, according to Quiñones. . People spotted in the water did not appear to be wearing life jackets, according to the Coast Guard.

Agencies transported the migrants to Crash Boat Beach in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, where they are receiving emergency medical assistance, Quiñones said. Eight Haitian nationals are receiving treatment at El Buen Samaritano Hospital in Aguadilla, he said.

US Coast Guard rescue teams search for survivors after a boat apparently full of migrants capsized off Puerto Rico, killing 11 passengers. Above, a helicopter takes off from a Coast Guard Cutter a week after 2017’s Hurricane Maria in San Juan.
Ricardo ARDUENGO/Getty Images

“The search is ongoing,” said U.S. Coast Guard spokesman Ricardo Castrodad. Newsweek.

He said the Coast Guard sent a C-130 aircraft from its base in Clearwater, Fla., which he says can search a wider area and stay in the air longer. Additionally, the Coast Guard’s Cutter Joseph Tezanos, a rapid response vessel, is on the scene along with helicopters, Castrodad said.

Human Rights Watch released a report in March describing the chaotic conditions faced by Haitian migrants, many of whom are fleeing violence and poverty, when deported. The watchdog group said 25,765 people were deported or deported to Haiti from Jan. 1, 2021, to Feb. 26, 2022. Of those, the United States returned 79%, or 20,309 people.

Migrants face dangerous conditions. In January, more than 100 migrants were rescued off Florida.

Border authorities continued to block their entry into the United States. In March, about 150 Haitian migrants landed on a private beach about 20 miles west of Key West.

Patrol Chief Agent Walter N. Slosar said on Twitter Monday that U.S. Border Patrol agents responded to 104 maritime contraband incidents that made landfall in Florida since Oct. 1. Over the weekend, he said Border Patrol agents and local authorities apprehended 58 Cuban migrants and responded to six smuggling incidents.

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Afghanistan: nearly 20 million people suffer from hunger https://seatowct.com/afghanistan-nearly-20-million-people-suffer-from-hunger/ Wed, 11 May 2022 06:50:07 +0000 https://seatowct.com/afghanistan-nearly-20-million-people-suffer-from-hunger/ Bangladesh is a key US ally in South Asia. On issues such as regional and global security, the fight against terrorism and climate change, the two countries benefit from substantial collaboration. Bangladesh has played an important role in the major international development projects of the Obama administration, particularly in the areas of food security, health […]]]>

Bangladesh is a key US ally in South Asia. On issues such as regional and global security, the fight against terrorism and climate change, the two countries benefit from substantial collaboration. Bangladesh has played an important role in the major international development projects of the Obama administration, particularly in the areas of food security, health and the environment. In 2012, the two countries signed a Strategic Conversation Agreement. In 2015, Marcia Bernicat, the United States Ambassador to Bangladesh, called the relationship “dynamic, multifaceted, and significant.

The United States’ strategy with Bangladesh places great importance on political stability, human rights and democracy. Bangladesh is also considered by the United States as a moderate Muslim friend among Islamic countries.

The United States is one of Bangladesh’s most important strategic military partners. Defense cooperation between the United States and Bangladesh is growing day by day. Regular joint exercises are practiced, especially in the Bay of Bengal. The United States Pacific Command regularly engages the Bangladesh Armed Forces. The United States has also helped train the Bangladesh Navy’s elite SWADS marine unit, which is modeled after US and South Korean special forces.

Bangladesh is the largest donor to UN peacekeeping operations in the world. Bangladeshi peacekeeping missions have benefited greatly from US sponsorship.

Strong and expanding economic ties between the two nations are the foundation of U.S.-Bangladesh relations. Bangladesh has suddenly become one of the fastest growing economies in the world over the past five decades. Bangladesh is on track to become the world’s 24th largest economy in 10 years, with an expected growth rate of 7.2% in 2022. Bangladesh’s growth and resilience rely on development and foreign direct investment, and governments United remain a dedicated partner.

Bangladesh is located in the heart of the Indo-Pacific, a region the Biden-Harris administration has prioritized for economic connectivity, bilateral relations are also centered on shared democratic values, free enterprise, supply chains resilient, as well as the prosperity and health of both. country people.

We see important areas of engagement that could be strengthened to deepen defense and security cooperation as the two mark 50 years of U.S.-Bangladesh relations on April 4, 2022.

This was particularly the case during the pandemic, when Bangladesh delivered over 6 million pieces of personal protective equipment to the United States during the catastrophic first wave of Covid-19.

However, 2021 has been a difficult year for U.S.-Bangladesh relations. Washington had imposed sanctions on the Bangladesh Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) and several current and former officers for a long history of human rights abuses, including extrajudicial executions on December 10, 2021. The Biden administration did not not invite Bangladesh to the virtual democracy summit that same month.

The United States recently released a report on the state of human rights in 198 countries in 2021. Bangladesh has been accused of human rights abuses by the country’s State Department.

According to the research, there has been widespread impunity for security force abuses and corruption in Bangladesh. But Bangladesh criticized the report.

Among these, the signing of a draft defense cooperation agreement during Nuland’s visit to Dhaka illustrates this effort. However, Washington may continue to view Dhaka as a security partner in the region. The United States now wants to build a strategic relationship with Bangladesh.

United States President Joe Biden has expressed his belief that the Dhaka-Washington relationship will thrive over the next 50 years and beyond.

In a letter to Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, he noted that “our defense cooperation is stronger than ever,” the US president said, adding that the Bangladesh Coast Guard and Navy are essential allies. to ensure a free and open Indo-Pacific area, as well as to contribute to the regional fight against human trafficking and illicit drug trafficking.

According to US government websites, Bangladesh has received $66.9 million in Foreign Military Funding (FMF) and $7.29 million in International Military Education and Training (IMET) assistance from the United States. United since 2015. FMF funding includes $10 million in bilateral programs and $56.9 million. in the regional FMF for the Bay of Bengal Initiative. With FMF support, the Department of State’s Bay of Bengal Initiative aims to improve the ability of civilian and military actors to detect illicit activities within their borders and in the region, to build networks and habits of cooperation to enable countries to share information, to develop their ability to react quickly to illicit activities and to help our partners establish a rules-based order in the Indian Ocean region.

In support of the Indo-Pacific strategy, U.S. security assistance to Bangladesh has enhanced maritime security, freedom of navigation, and humanitarian assistance/disaster response capabilities. These funds were used to purchase patrol boats for the Bangladesh Army, additional patrol boats for the navy, international peacekeeping and border security missions; electronic and mechanical upgrades to fast patrol boats from the Bangladesh Navy and former US Coast Guard; technical and vocational training of Bangladeshi military and coastguard personnel; and joint military exercises. This assistance has greatly assisted Bangladesh in its efforts to improve its knowledge and control of the maritime domain.

On April 18, Bangladeshi Army Chief General SM Shafiuddin Ahmed visited the United States at the invitation of US Army Chief of Staff General James C McConville, a statement said. of ISPR. This visit could help strengthen bilateral defense ties. Bilateral defense ties can strengthen bilateral relations. The United States needs Bangladesh in the region and vice versa. This visit conveyed the message that despite some bilateral problems, both countries are very interested in further strengthening bilateral relations. It can help solve bilateral problems. Bangladesh and the United States must engage as trusted partners to address some common issues.

According to media reports, HM Shafiuddin Ahmed paid a courtesy call on General Daniel R Hokanson, Chief of the National Guard Bureau and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. James M Martin, Marine Corps Deputy Commandant General Eric M Smith and Southeast Asia Director General Laurie Abel of the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy April 20-22.

During the meetings, issues of common interest to both forces were discussed, including United Nations peacekeeping missions and post-disaster humanitarian assistance.

According to the press release, the Army Chief of Staff was also inducted into the Near East and South Asia Center (NESA) Hall of Fame as an alumnus of the program. National Defense University NESA.

UN officials have expressed interest in sending more Bangladeshi peacekeepers to the UN. The Bangladesh Army Chief has requested that the Bangladeshi contingents of the UN peacekeeping force replace their old weapons and equipment with new weapons and equipment from Bangladesh.

The Chief of the Armed Forces met Gilles Michaud, Under-Secretary General of the United Nations Department of Security and Safety; Major General Maureen O’Brien, acting military adviser; Mohammed Khaled Khiari, Assistant Secretary General (ASG), Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs; Christian Saunders, ASG, Operational Support Department; and Police Advisor Luis Ribeiro Carrilho during his visit to United Nations Headquarters in New York on April 25-26.

According to a press release from the Permanent Mission of Bangladesh to the United Nations, the conversations were quite fruitful and highlighted many facets of the vital commitment of Bangladeshi peacekeepers to UN operations.

During the meetings, the army chief emphasized Bangladesh’s constitutional commitment to world peace and raised questions regarding Bangladesh’s interest in UN peacekeeping operations, such as that the recruitment of more Bangladeshi peacekeepers, including women, the appointment of senior military officials in various peacekeeping operations, participation in peacekeeping missions in collaboration with d other countries, the deployment of armed personnel carriers from Bangladesh and the recruitment of armed personnel carriers from Bangladesh.

The United States intends to help Bangladesh modernize and institutionalize its armed forces by providing defense equipment and training.

The United States highlighted the signing of two defense agreements – GSOMIA and ACSA – which serve as the foundation for defense trade and cooperation.

However, the majority of US military assistance to Bangladesh takes the form of training for defense professionals and joint exercises between two forces. The United States Pacific Command regularly engages the Bangladesh Armed Forces. US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper visited Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and discussed, among other things, military cooperation between the two countries. The Bangladeshi army chief paid his visit to the United States this month after the successful “security partnership dialogue” in April. 2022 in Dhaka. This visit is very important for Bangladesh and the United States in the region. The United States and Bangladesh further strengthened their defense ties through this visit.

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Advent Technologies Enters into Technology Assessment Agreement with the World’s Second Largest Automaker https://seatowct.com/advent-technologies-enters-into-technology-assessment-agreement-with-the-worlds-second-largest-automaker/ Mon, 09 May 2022 15:05:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/advent-technologies-enters-into-technology-assessment-agreement-with-the-worlds-second-largest-automaker/ BOSTON, May 09, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: DNA) (“Advent” or the “Company”), an innovation-driven leader in fuel cell technology and hydrogen, is pleased to announce the signing of a technology evaluation agreement with a second major global car manufacturer. With a common goal of sustainability and accelerating the decarbonization of the US automotive […]]]>

BOSTON, May 09, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: DNA) (“Advent” or the “Company”), an innovation-driven leader in fuel cell technology and hydrogen, is pleased to announce the signing of a technology evaluation agreement with a second major global car manufacturer.

With a common goal of sustainability and accelerating the decarbonization of the US automotive industry, Advent supports efforts to advance innovative fuel cell technology as a sustainable and efficient option for achieving carbon neutrality. Specifically, Advent will provide assistance through:

  • Provide membrane electrode assemblies (“MEA”) for testing, evaluation, and optimization under collaborator conditions.

  • Provide assistance on MEA operational metrics while collaborator provides feedback to Advent on performance and sustainability.

  • Sharing technical know-how for fuel cells, proprietary HT-PEM technology and leveraging HT PEM for advanced cooling systems.

A primary focus will be to conduct a detailed evaluation of Advent’s proprietary HT-PEM technology and newly launched MEAs to examine future opportunities. Subject to the successful execution of the first phase of the project, the companies will endeavor to establish a joint development agreement governing, among other things, specific requirements, objectives, milestones and plans for the product.

The new Advent MEAs that will be tested in this project are currently being developed under The Innovator, Advent’s joint development program with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. MEAs are the most important components of a fuel cell as they largely define the performance, lifetime, weight and cost of the final system. Advent MEAs operate at high temperatures (80ohC to 240ohC) while the LT-PEM technology in place is limited to less than 100ohC. High temperature operation is essential for efficient heat removal in heavy mobility applications, making HT-PEM an ideal technology for trucks, aviation and marine. Additionally, Advent MEAs can run on impure hydrogen that can be reformed onboard from methanol, natural gas and other renewable fuels, and are resistant to extremes of temperature, humidity and fuel quality. the air.

Dr. Emory De Castro, Chief Technology Officer of Advent, said, “We look forward to decarbonizing the automotive industry using next-generation fuel cell technology and welcome this very impactful collaboration. MEA is the heart of the fuel cell and an essential component used in fuel cells and other electrochemical applications such as CO2-free hydrogen production and energy storage. At Advent technologies, we all look forward to a long and fruitful collaboration, which will allow us to share our long-standing expertise and help reshape the automotive industry. replacing the need for conventional fuels while producing clean energy.”

About Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc.

Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. is an American company that develops, manufactures and assembles fuel cell systems and critical components for fuel cells and other advanced energy systems. Advent is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, with offices in California, Denmark, Germany, Greece and the Philippines. With more than 150 patents issued, pending or licensed for its fuel cell technology, Advent owns the intellectual property of the next generation HT-PEM which allows various fuels to operate at high temperatures under extreme conditions – providing a “Any fuel. Everywhere.” option for automotive, marine, aviation and power generation industries. For more information, visit www.advent.energy.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements can generally be identified by the use of words such as “anticipates”, “expects”, “plans”, “could”, “may”, “will”, “believes”, “estimates”, “anticipates,” “goal,” “project” and other words of similar meaning. Each forward-looking statement contained in this press release is subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by this statement. Applicable risks and uncertainties include, among others, future financial performance; liquidity and potential trading of government securities; the impact of the outcome of any known and unknown litigation; to forecast and maintain an adequate rate of revenue growth and to plan its expenses appropriately; expectations regarding future expenses; future revenue mix and effect on gross margins; attraction and retention of qualified directors, officers, employees and key personnel; ability to compete effectively in a competitive industry; ability to protect and enhance the company’s reputation and brand; expectations regarding relationships and actions with technology partners and other third parties; the impact of future regulatory, judicial and legislative changes on the industry; future arrangements with, or investments in, other entities or associations; and intense competition and competitive pressure from other businesses around the world; and the risks identified under “Risk Factors” in Advent’s annual report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, together with such other information each has with the SEC. We caution investors not to place significant reliance on any forward-looking statements contained in this press release. We encourage you to read the filings with the SEC, available at www.sec.gov, for a discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date of this document, without obligation to update or revise any of these statements. Investors, potential investors and others should pay particular attention to these risks and uncertainties.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220509005764/en/

contacts

Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc.
Michael Trontzos / Chris Kaskavelis
press@advent.energy

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Alabama Marine veteran volunteers in Ukraine https://seatowct.com/alabama-marine-veteran-volunteers-in-ukraine/ Sat, 07 May 2022 19:19:37 +0000 https://seatowct.com/alabama-marine-veteran-volunteers-in-ukraine/ CULLMAN, Ala. – For about a month now, U.S. Navy veteran Sean Schofield has been sending dispatches to Cullman from a place few would volunteer to go. Since the end of March, he has been one of more than 6,000 foreign volunteers from the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom and other Western countries who […]]]>

CULLMAN, Ala. – For about a month now, U.S. Navy veteran Sean Schofield has been sending dispatches to Cullman from a place few would volunteer to go. Since the end of March, he has been one of more than 6,000 foreign volunteers from the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom and other Western countries who have left their civilian lives behind and traveled to Ukraine, helping the military personnel and civilian supporters to mount a sovereign defense against Russian invasion.

During this time, Schofield let his country know that he had already seen active combat, participated in civilian escort missions in combat zones and participated firsthand in Ukraine’s ad hoc response to the huge Russian military machine. He has already traveled the country almost from end to end, settling recently (at the request of Ukraine) in the outskirts of kyiv. There, he served as an instructor with a training unit that trains Ukraine’s armed forces — many of whom are recent enlistees with no prior experience — in an intensive two-week intensive military course before they are sent to the forehead.

Schofield’s presence in Ukraine has been facilitated by the International Territorial Defense Legion of Ukraine, a unit of the Ukrainian Armed Forces created earlier this year by the Ukrainian government under President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. This is by no means a mercenary task: the Ukrainian government provides foreign volunteers like Schofield with accommodation and food, but everything else, including the cost of the flight to get there, is covered. of the volunteer.

“The Ukrainian embassy basically explained it like this: ‘We’re not going to pay you, but if you want to come at your own expense, do it: we’ll feed you and give you a place to sleep,'” says Ken Brown , a Cullman resident and active local VFW member who has aired a series of interviews with his fellow service member, since Schofield landed in Ukraine, on local television and on Facebook.

“He made it there, but he did it out of his own pocket,” says Brown. “It cost him $1,800 to get there, he’ll need another $1,800 to get back, plus $2,000 for equipment and a $1,000 weapons license that goes to the Ukrainian government. The original plan was that he will be there until the end of June – if all goes well. Of course, the group of international special forces is in Kyiv, and if the capital is threatened again, it is possible that he will be involved in a response to that – and that would obviously affect his schedule.

Schofield has lived in Cullman with his wife and two children most of the time he has been in plain clothes, moving to Alabama from his home state of Massachusetts shortly after honorably leaving the Corps in 2005 following of a post-September. 11 tour of Iraq and Kuwait as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Schofield already knew what it was like to recommit to a cause he believed in: He joined the Marines at 18 straight out of high school and had completed his service, which included a deployment to Okinawa, Japan, in as an air gunner. Observer, in 2000. But like many soldiers, the September 11 attacks prompted him to return to uniform once more.

Leaving the comforts of home to volunteer in a foreign conflict was not a decision Schofield took lightly. In a recent video chat with Brown, Schofield said early reports of indiscriminate killings, coupled with the assault of invading a peacetime sovereign neighbor, sparked a volunteer instinct he had harbored since before re-enlisting. in the Marines following 9/11. attacks on the World Trade Center.

“‘The bad guys don’t even try to find the good guys in uniform and fight them,'” he explained. “They shoot everybody… It came down to a lot of the reasons I wanted to become a Marine in the first place. Marines are always the good guys; wherever they go…and I wore that uniform with so much pride.”

Not all of those who have traveled to Ukraine to help in the fight are soldiers: Brown estimates that more than half of the 6,000 international volunteers in the country are there to provide medical and social assistance. The trained military volunteer force of which Schofield is a part, he estimates, numbers between 2,500 and 3,000.

“He just felt he was equipped to go out there and be one of the people who could make a difference,” Brown said. “Sean is a Marine Corps-trained martial arts instructor, as well as a marksmanship instructor, and he’s seen combat since his service. That’s a pretty remarkable thing for someone who lives in Cullman to look at what’s going on there and think, ‘They need me. I can help.'”

Schofield is a member of his local VFW, which handles donations to fund the rest of his Ukraine tour – including his return trip. Checks to support Schofield’s volunteer mission can be made out in any amount, with “Sean Schofield” in the subject line, to Cullman Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2214, and dropped or mailed to VFW (112 Veterans Drive SW, Cullman, AL, 35055).

Marines serving with the 1st and 4th Reconnaissance Battalions performed static line jumps to maintain their qualifications and hone their flying skills here, June 22, 2013. (Cpl. Joseph Scanlan/Marine Corps)

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Irish Port Eyes Offshore Wind Opportunities. Faucets https://seatowct.com/irish-port-eyes-offshore-wind-opportunities-faucets/ Fri, 06 May 2022 10:48:32 +0000 https://seatowct.com/irish-port-eyes-offshore-wind-opportunities-faucets/ Shannon Foynes Port Company has chosen Bechtel to update its Vision 2041 master plan to accommodate offshore and onshore investment in and near its port in Ireland. Bechtel will help the company determine how to ensure significant port growth and expansion, including how it can support the offshore wind industry and the production of alternative […]]]>

Shannon Foynes Port Company has chosen Bechtel to update its Vision 2041 master plan to accommodate offshore and onshore investment in and near its port in Ireland.

Bechtel will help the company determine how to ensure significant port growth and expansion, including how it can support the offshore wind industry and the production of alternative transportation fuels.

Shannon Foynes Port is located in Ireland’s deepest sheltered commercial port, with jurisdiction over all maritime activity over a 500 square kilometer area on the Shannon Estuary, stretching from Kerry to Loop Head to to the city of Limerick.

“Along the world’s busiest shipping lanes and with water depths of up to 32 metres, the port is uniquely positioned to develop as a cargo hub serving domestic, European and global markets. The port is the largest industrial employer in the region and currently has the capacity to handle over 10 million tonnes per year.The expansion, including a new one-kilometre-long quay, will increase capacity to 20 million tonnes per year and will include up to 1,200 hectares of land zoned for strategic development,” Bechtel said.

According to the company, the port is also well positioned close to the Atlantic wind resource which will be essential for Ireland to achieve its ambition of generating 20 GW of offshore wind by 2050.

The expanded facilities at Shannon Foynes, according to Bechtel, would include hydrogen and ammonia production facilities for long-term energy storage and would also consider exporting the renewable energy/fuels produced.

“Unprecedented Opportunity”

“Bechtel’s role will be to assess and update the port’s master plan, known as Vision 2041, to make the most of these benefits, further drive growth and support the offshore wind industry. emerging in the region,” Bechtel said.

“Nine years ago, Vision 2041 was seen as a very ambitious blueprint, but we have since achieved all of the high-end growth targets identified for the interim period. We have also identified in it the opportunity ahead for what was then only emerging sectors, such as offshore renewables,” said Patrick Keating, Director General of the SFPC. “The estuary is now seen not only by the SFPC, but by the sector internationally, as an emerging hub in the renewable energy supply chain. Additionally, there is additional growth potential for the estuary as a major logistics hub. »

“Accelerating these opportunities requires updating Vision 2041 so that we have a strategic roadmap to realize the unprecedented opportunity for the company, the region and, indeed, the state” , Keating continued. “This is a critical time for us and we are delighted that Bechtel is supporting us.

“Their portfolio spanning infrastructure, renewables, fuel generation and financing makes them uniquely qualified to help us maximize the benefits of our deepwater advantage and expansion plan, as well as creating jobs, the supplier opportunities, the economic growth it will bring. We look forward to finalizing this over the next few months and unveiling this ambition to put Ireland at the forefront of the world in renewable energy and logistics.”

Ports act as focal points for offshore wind

“There are growing reasons to invest in port infrastructure to support the growth of offshore wind, and the importance of building local supply chains cannot be understated,” John said. Williams, Bechtelmanaging director for the UK and Ireland.

“The ports act as focal points during the manufacture, installation and operation of offshore wind farms, and Shannon Foynes is strategically ideal to support the Irish offshore wind industry, as well as to expand to play an even greater role in European shipping. We are delighted to have the opportunity to partner with Shannon Foynes Port Company on their master plan update.”

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Austal is bagging $230.5 million to design and build https://seatowct.com/austal-is-bagging-230-5-million-to-design-and-build/ Wed, 04 May 2022 05:52:17 +0000 https://seatowct.com/austal-is-bagging-230-5-million-to-design-and-build/ Austal USA has been awarded a $230.5 million contract for the detailed design and construction of EPF 16, the Navy’s newest expeditionary fast transport vessel (EPF). Austal USA has so far delivered 12 EPFs. Three additional EPFs are currently under construction. “ETHs have demonstrated their operational capability to carry out a variety of missions, including […]]]>

Austal USA has been awarded a $230.5 million contract for the detailed design and construction of EPF 16, the Navy’s newest expeditionary fast transport vessel (EPF).

Austal USA has so far delivered 12 EPFs. Three additional EPFs are currently under construction.

“ETHs have demonstrated their operational capability to carry out a variety of missions, including humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, maritime security, surveillance, command and control, and counter-narcotics missions in the The inherent versatility of the EPF design allows its mission to be tailored to the needs of each geographical fleet command and combatant commander,” Austal said.

“Like previously delivered EPFs, EPF 16 will benefit from the serial production of this program, which will not only result in a world-class ship, but also provide assurance to the United States Navy that the capability will be delivered within the on time and on schedule,” Austal said. President of the United States rusty murdaugh. “Our reputation for quality is a direct reflection of the commitment and dedication of our talented shipbuilders and suppliers.”

EPF 16 will be the third ship built in the Flight II configuration.

“Flight II ships will enhance the original Spearhead-class capabilities through the incorporation of reconfigurable spaces for operating rooms and post-surgical recovery efforts. Combined with the ship’s flight deck which is capable of landing V-22 aircraft, the Flight II ships offer unparalleled versatility,” says Austal USA.

Construction of EPF 16 is expected to begin later this year with delivery scheduled for 2025.

Austal USA is currently under contract to build additional EPFs, the independent-variant Littoral gunship, and Navajo-class tow, salvage, and salvage (T-ATS) vessels and supports the Navy’s unmanned vessel programs taking advantage of its advanced machinery control system.

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First Ukrainian civilians escape Mariupol steelworks, hundreds remain https://seatowct.com/first-ukrainian-civilians-escape-mariupol-steelworks-hundreds-remain/ Mon, 02 May 2022 13:52:32 +0000 https://seatowct.com/first-ukrainian-civilians-escape-mariupol-steelworks-hundreds-remain/ ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — People fleeing besieged Mariupol described weeks of shelling and deprivation as they arrived in Ukrainian-held territory on Monday, where officials and relief workers were eagerly awaiting the first group of civilians freed from a steelworks which is the last redoubt of Ukrainian fighters in the devastated port city. Video uploaded by […]]]>

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — People fleeing besieged Mariupol described weeks of shelling and deprivation as they arrived in Ukrainian-held territory on Monday, where officials and relief workers were eagerly awaiting the first group of civilians freed from a steelworks which is the last redoubt of Ukrainian fighters in the devastated port city.

Video uploaded by Ukrainian forces on Sunday showed elderly women and mothers with young children climbing a steep pile of rubble from the sprawling Azovstal steelworks and eventually boarding a bus.

LOOK: Pelosi pledges US support during Ukraine visit as evacuations begin in war-torn Mariupol

More than 100 civilians from the factory were due to arrive in Zaporizhzhia, about 230 kilometers northwest of Mariupol, on Monday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said.

The evacuation, if successful, would represent rare progress in mitigating the human cost of the nearly 10-week war, which has caused particular suffering in Mariupol. Previous attempts to open safe corridors out of the Sea of ​​Azov city and other places have failed,
with Ukrainian officials repeatedly accused Russian forces of firing and shelling along agreed evacuation routes.

“Today, for the first time since all the days of the war, this vitally needed green corridor has started to work,” Zelenskyy said Sunday in a pre-recorded address posted on his Telegram messaging channel.

At least some of those evacuated from the plant were apparently taken to a village controlled by Moscow-backed separatists. The Russian military said on Monday that some had opted to remain in breakaway areas, while dozens left for Ukrainian-held territory. The information could not be independently verified.

In the past, Ukrainian officials have accused Moscow troops of forcibly moving civilians from captured areas to Russia; Moscow said people wanted to go to Russia.

Zelenskyy told Greek state television that the remaining civilians at the Mariupol steel plant were afraid to board the buses because they thought they would be taken to Russia. He said he had been assured by the United Nations that they would be allowed to travel to areas controlled by his government.

Mariupol became the symbol of human misery inflicted by war. A Russian siege trapped civilians with little access to food, water and electricity, as forces from Moscow pounded the ruined city in the face of stronger-than-expected Ukrainian resistance.

Ukraine’s defense also thwarted Moscow’s attempt to take kyiv in the early weeks of the war and Russia has now shifted its focus to Donbass, the industrial heartland of eastern Ukraine, where separatists backed by Moscow have been fighting Ukrainian forces since 2014. Mariupol is in the Donbass. .

Russia says its military has hit dozens of military targets in the region in the past day alone. But Ukrainian and Western officials say troops in Moscow are using indiscriminate weapons that are taking a heavy toll on civilians and making only slow progress.
While official evacuations have often failed, many people have managed to flee Mariupol on their own in recent weeks. Others are unable to escape.

“People without cars cannot leave. They are desperate,” said Olena Gibert, who was among those who arrived at a UN-supported reception center in Zaporizhzhia in dusty and often damaged private cars. “We have to go find them. People have nothing. We had nothing.

She said many people still in Mariupol want to escape the Russian-controlled city, but cannot say so openly in the atmosphere of constant pro-Russian propaganda.

Anastasiia Dembytska, who took advantage of the brief ceasefire around the evacuation of civilians from the steel plant to leave with her daughter, nephew and dog, told The Associated Press her family survived by cooking on a makeshift stove and drinking well water.

She said she could see the steelworks from her window, when she dared to look outside.

“We could see the rockets flying” and clouds of smoke over the plant, she said.

A defender of the factory said Russian forces resumed shelling the factory on Sunday as soon as some civilians were evacuated. It was unclear if there would be any further evacuation attempts.

Denys Shlega, commander of the Ukrainian National Guard’s 12th Operational Brigade, said in a television interview that several hundred civilians remained trapped alongside nearly 500 wounded soldiers and “many” corpses.

“Several dozen young children are still in the bunkers under the factory,” Shlega said.

Before the weekend evacuation, around 1,000 civilians were also in the vast Soviet-era steelworks, along with around 2,000 Ukrainian fighters. In total, up to 100,000 people could still be in Mariupol.

The city, which had a prewar population of more than 400,000, is a key Russian target because its capture would deprive Ukraine of a vital port, allow Moscow to establish a land corridor to the Crimean peninsula, which it seized from Ukraine in 2014. , and release troops to fight elsewhere in the Donbass.

A Ukrainian officer at the plant urged groups like the UN and the Red Cross to ensure the evacuation of injured fighters, although he acknowledged that it was difficult to reach some of the injured.

READ MORE: Death of ex-US marine shines light on Americans fighting in Ukraine

“There is rubble. We don’t have any special equipment. It is difficult for soldiers to pick up plates weighing tons only with their arms,” Svyatoslav Palamar, deputy commander of the Azov regiment, told the AP in an interview. “We hear voices of people who are still alive” inside destroyed buildings.

The Azov Regiment was originally a far-right paramilitary unit and is now part of the Ukrainian army.

The Russian Defense Ministry said its forces had struck dozens of military targets in eastern Ukraine in the past 24 hours, including concentrations of troops and weapons and an ammunition dump near Chervone in the Zaporizhzhia region, west of Donbass.

The information could not be independently verified. The Ukrainian president’s office said at least three people had been killed and seven others, including a child, injured in Donbass over the past 24 hours. The Zaporizhzhia regional administration said at least two people died and four others were injured in the Russian shelling of the town of Orikhiv.

A full picture of the battle unfolding in eastern Ukraine is difficult to grasp. The fighting makes travel for journalists dangerous, and both sides have introduced strict restrictions on reporting from the combat zone.

The Ukrainian army claimed Monday to have destroyed two small Russian patrol boats in the Black Sea. Drone footage posted online showed what the Ukrainians described as two Russian Raptor boats exploding after being hit by missiles.

The AP could not immediately independently confirm the strikes.

Hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid flowed into Ukraine during the war, but Russia’s vast arsenals mean Ukraine still needs massive support. Zelenskyy appealed to the West for more weapons and tougher economic sanctions against Russia.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other U.S. lawmakers visited Zelenskyy on Saturday to show U.S. support. On Monday, the delegation met Polish President Andrzej Duda and lawmakers in Warsaw to express their gratitude to the country for its support for Ukraine.

European Union energy ministers were meeting on Monday to discuss a new set of sanctions, which could include restrictions on Russian oil – although Russia-dependent members of the 27-nation bloc, including the Hungary and Slovakia, are reluctant to take harsh measures.

Varenytsia reported from Kyiv, Ukraine. Associated Press journalists Yesica Fisch in Sloviansk, Jon Gambrell and Yuras Karmanau in Lviv, Mstyslav Chernov in Kharkiv and AP staff around the world contributed to this report.

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